unique visitors counter Kathy Griffin Comes Clean About Being A Junkie: “I was doing, like, a rich white lady speedball, basically – Washington News

Kathy Griffin Comes Clean About Being A Junkie: “I was doing, like, a rich white lady speedball, basically

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Kathy Griffin came clean on The New York Times’ Sway podcast about her struggle with pill addiction calling it almost comical that she turned into a junkie in her 50s.

She said: “I think, well, look, I think that I’m probably an addictive person, you know. But you have to admit, it’s almost comical,” she continued. “I went in the hospital for pill addiction at 59 years old. Who the hell becomes a junkie in their late 50s? Me.”

“I didn’t know what to do with myself. I was just such a crazy workaholic, and all of a sudden, I had this time on my hands, and then I was depressed, and things just weren’t looking up. Not to blame COVID, but then COVID also is like, just laying around all day and trying to figure out life.

“So that was rough, although it was a good thing, ultimately, and it was sobering, quite literally.

“And then you fall into the ‘Life will be better for my husband without me around.

“And you then call the estate attorney and the whole thing.

“It just came to a point where I was convinced that I had a good run on this planet and now it’s time for me to go.

“It’s been good. I’ve done a lot of great stuff and so you know, it gets pretty crazy.”

Griffin said she was taking a drug cocktail of opiates, benzodiazepines, and speed.  

She said she was on Oxycontin, Valium, Klonopin, Ativan, Adderall, and Provigil.

“I was doing, like, a rich white lady speedball, basically,” she said.

“I was addicted like the classic story. I had injuries, and then blah, blah, blah and the addiction “got away from me.

 “Like, I kind of knew it was getting bad, but then I didn’t.

After telling doctors that she had attempted suicide, Griffin was admitted to the psychiatric ward.

“I’m there, in the hospital psych ward for three days, and boy, that will sober you up like nothing.

“You have no drugs, you’re just shaking, and I’m looking at the ceiling and just reassessing life choices and you have nothing but your own thoughts.

“That really saved my life.

“Through that process, you are kind of unpacking anything and everything.

“Everything is kind of surrounded by that a little bit,” she said.